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NEWS FROM THE FARM

BALDOR'S WEEKLY PRODUCE MARKET UPDATE

[Please note: Availability & sourcing are subject to change.]

Top Stories | September 16, 2021

Fresh Fruit for Fall

Fresh Fruit for Fall

  • Stone fruit season isn’t done yet! From California’s Frog Hollow Farm, we have Emerald Beaut and Honey Punch pluots in house; their juicy Flavor Hearts are set to arrive this weekend. Kingsburg Orchards continues to harvest gorgeous pluots. Locally, Hudson River Fruit is sending prune plums, an elegant addition to any plate or centerpiece.
  • Other additions to fall’s cornucopia include pomegranates (the whole fruit and the arils), while teeny, covetable, Oregon-grown kiwi berries always make a splash. Next week, we're expecting sweet, subtly-spiced, chocolate persimmons, which are one of autumn’s fleeting joys.
Local Changes

Local Changes

  • What’s out: Norwich Meadows Farm melons and most of their beans; pick up their terrific fresh shelling beans and thin-skinned squash while you still can. Lancaster Farm Fresh has also closed out their melon season, while Scholl Orchards has finished up with peaches.
  • What’s in: Lots of local peppers still look great, and we’re particularly excited to start receiving heat-free ají dulce chiles from Eckerton Hill Farm; Eckerton will soon be our exclusive source for local Sungold tomatoes. Hepworth Farms continues to offer excellent tomatoes. Organic centercut, butternut, spaghetti, carnival, and delicata squashes are arriving from Lancaster Farm Fresh.
Where There’s Smoke…

Where There’s Smoke…

  • Wildfires threaten crops with smoke as well as flames. The resulting cloud cover traps excess heat and slows growth. In the hope that the spuds size up, the GPOD season has been delayed until late September. In Washington, few onions are achieving the 4.5-inch Super size; expect slightly smaller, 4-inch Colossals mixed in among the Supers.
  • Smoke stunts fruits, too. While we have a full assortment of figs, including white, black, brown, and tiger stripe, the fruit is smaller than usual and not quite as flavorful as we’d like. That said, the figs continue to please diners and are worth ordering before the season ends.
Floods & Droughts

Floods & Droughts

  • Henri, Ida, Nicholas…this year’s tropical storm season has brought devastating wet weather and flooding to the East Coast and has damaged a number of crops. Crate arugula, romaine, kale, parsley, and cilantro will be somewhat limited in the weeks ahead as fields recover from damage.
  • Heatwaves in Canada and California have stunted the growth of lettuces, and the lettuce category is short across the board. Iceberg is very pricey and Canadian fields will be gapping for two weeks. Insects have damaged wrapped lettuce crops, limiting availability. Red oak, red romaine, and lollo rosso will be limited for two to three weeks.
Mushroom Misses

Mushroom Misses

  • Problems with shipping continue to cause trouble for internationally traded goods; even the cost of shipping containers has nearly quadrupled. Unfortunately, that means limited availability of inoculated logs and other raw materials needed for mushroom production. Labor shortages only exacerbate these issues.
  • Mushrooms affected include shiitakes, portobellos, oysters, and creminis out of Pennsylvania, which all remain tight. Beech mushrooms, brown mushrooms, and white mushrooms from Asia cost significantly more than normal due to delays. Fortunately, fresh chicken of the woods and wild chanterelles just arrived, and it’s peak season for porcinis and black trumpets.
Fall Specialty Produce Planner

Fall Specialty Produce Planner

  • Just in time for fall menu planning, we’ve put together a Fall Specialty Produce Planning Guide! Based on arrival dates from previous years and ETA’s from our farm partners, these are our best predictions for fall arrivals.